Getting Good Speakers for a Grassroots Summit

One of the key things that you need to pay a lot of attention to when organizing a grassroots summit is the issue of getting good speakers for the summit. The caliber of speakers you are able to get for a grassroots summit plays a key role in determining whether or not the summit ends up being a success. Thus, if you wish for your grassroots summit to be a worthwhile event, you need to ensure that you spare no effort in getting good speakers for it.

good speakers

There are two broad categories of speakers that you can get for a grassroots summit. Firstly, you can have some of the attendees (the members of grassroots groups who attend the summit) deliver addresses. This is to say that you can simply get some speakers from the ranks of the summit’s attendees. These may be useful to the extent that they can give addresses touching on their personal experiences running grassroots organizations. Secondly, you can get some external resource people – for instance various types of experts – to give addresses at the grassroots summit. These can give addresses focusing on the technical aspects of running grassroots organizations. They can also give expert advice on the best ways to run the grassroots organizations.

Having selected the people you wish to speak at the grassroots summit, you need to ensure that they are well briefed. You need to give them a general plan on what you expect them to speak about, how long they will have to speak, what they should (and what they shouldn’t) touch on… and so on. You also need to ensure that you give them adequate time to prepare their addresses. And once they have prepared their addresses, you need to go through the said addresses with them: to see whether or not there are things that need to be ironed out. During the actual summits, you need to ensure that you introduce the selected speakers properly, and that you give them ample time to deliver their addresses to the summits’ attendees.

Making the Budget for a Grassroots Summit

A grassroots summit costs quite a bit of money to organize. Therefore, one of the first things you need to come up with, when organizing a grassroots summit, is a budget. In today’s blog post, I will explore some of the considerations you need to make when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit. In other words, I will be focusing on the expenses you need to factor in, when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit. I will also describe the process you need to use, when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit.

One of the major expenses that you will probably have to factor in when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit is that of hiring the summit’s venue. That is unless you can get someone willing to allow you to use their facilities for free.

Another major expense that you will probably have to factor in when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit is that of hiring a public address system for the summit. That is the case, unless the summit you have in mind is a very small one: the sort of summit where people can communicate without the need for a public address system.

Yet another major expense that you will probably have to factor in when preparing a budget for a grassroots summit is that of hiring the people (the staff) you will need to run the summit. These would include the people who would be transporting the stuff you need for the summit to the summit’s venue, the people who would be cleaning the summit’s venue and the people who would deliver addresses at the summit. You may also need to factor in expenses for the people who would provide security at the summit.

A need may also arise for you to hire the furniture (tables and chairs) you’d need to use in the summit, besides having to cater for attendees’ meals and accommodation.

The process for making the budget for a grassroots summit should be a straightforward one. You start by making a list of the things you will need in the summit. Then you make enquiries, as to what the various things are likely to cost. Then, based on the estimates you obtain, you come up with a budget, and figure out ways of funding it.

Three Challenges That You are Almost Certainly Bound to Encounter While Organizing a Grassroots Summit

I have been involved in the organization of grassroots summits for quite a good number of years now. Over that period of time, I have come to conclude that organizing a grassroots summit will always be a challenging undertaking. In other words, there are certain challenges that you will almost certainly encounter while organizing a grassroots summit of any sort. In this blog post, I will shed some light on those challenges.

submits grassroot

The first challenge that you are almost certainly bound to encounter while organizing a grassroots summit is that of getting the people to understand (and buy into) the agenda of the summit. More often than not, when you try to sell the agenda of the summit to the targeted audience, you will discover that the people in the audience think that you have another ‘hidden’ agenda. It can get very frustrating. Even where no such suspicions exist, you may nonetheless have difficulties getting people to appreciate the aims of the summit, and how they stand to benefit from it.

The second challenge that you are almost certainly bound to encounter while organizing a grassroots summit is that of getting money to finance the summit. Getting the people to pay for attendance can often be a tall order. You are often left with no option but to seek for donations: but then, the donors will often want to insert their agendas into the summit, in exchange for the funding they provide. This can often lead to a situation where you end up having a (donor-funded) summit that is very different from what you had in mind when you set out.

The third challenge that you are almost certainly bound to encounter while organizing a grassroots summit is that of getting people to sacrifice their time, to attend the summit. You come to realize that people’s commitments to the grassroots groups they belong to is usually very limited. If they are requested to sacrifice an hour or two to attend a grassroots meeting at the local level, they are often willing to oblige. But when asked to sacrifice three or four entire days to attend a grassroots summit, they find the sacrifice too huge (which is understandable, given the fact that the people in question often get very little from the grassroots organizations they belong to). In the final analysis, you could find yourself with an awkward situation where people are demanding to be paid, say, by having their debit cards at www.citicards.com loaded with money, so that they can attend the summit! Yet the summit is meant to help them – and it is them who would actually have been expected to chip in financially.